Radiometric dating decay curves

We could measure (a) how much water the tank holds, (b) how much is still in the tank, and (c) the rate at which it is leaking out.

We can calculate the age of the hole by subtracting (b) from (a) to find out how much water has left the tank, and then dividing this by (c), the rate at which it is leaking out.

Desmond Clark (1979) wrote that were it not for radiocarbon dating, "we would still be foundering in a sea of imprecisions sometime bred of inspired guesswork but more often of imaginative speculation" (Clark, 1979:7).

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Nyerup's words illustrate poignantly the critical power and importance of dating; to order time.

Radiocarbon dating has been one of the most significant discoveries in 20th century science.

The radiocarbon method was developed by a team of scientists led by the late Professor Willard F.

Libby of the University of Chicago in immediate post-WW2 years.

The procedure, however, is difficult, and many tests have shown that it can be inaccurate, and it is at times not even considered reliable by mainstream scientists.

It is impossible to measure the age of something, except to time it as it actually occurs, so radioactive dating methods calculate the age, based on (i) measurements of quantities of specified materials, (ii) measurements of decay rates, and (iii) assumptions about the history of the sample.

The uncertainties in the crucial K/K abundance ratio also need to be considered, because there is no agreement on it.

The value of 0.011672±0.000041% determined in 1975 is still adopted, but the value of 0.011668±0.000008% determined in 2013 has yet to be recognized.

"Everything which has come down to us from heathendom is wrapped in a thick fog; it belongs to a space of time we cannot measure.

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